Sunday, May 28, 2006

Chinese "ketupat"

The Chinese Ketupat



How the "Chang" look-like



The end product:...




In the ketupat for satay.. the difference, there's nothing except rice but for the Chinese Chang, they put a lot of ingridents same like the steam paus.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

The Chinese dumpling festival is celebrated on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month, which corresponds with today on the western calendar.

In the old days, it used to be a seasonal dish but commercialism dictates that it is available throughout the year these days.

How Chinese dumplings came about

LEGEND has it that a long time ago in China, a poet and elder statesman by the name of Qu Yuan had sacrificed himself by jumping into a freshwater lake. He did that to protest against injustice and corruption.

When people saw his selfless act, they honoured him by setting off fire-crackers and banging gongs to scare off demons and underwater creatures which they fear may devour the poet’s remains.

They also made glutinous rice dumplings stuffed with meat and wrapped in bamboo leaves to appease the poet’s spirit.

http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/nst/Wednesday/Features/20060530173056/Article/index_html

Anonymous said...

Festival celebrates memory of poet Qu
2006-05-29
WITH the coming of Duanwu Festival, also known as the Dragon Boat Festival, people are busy preparing for the celebration.

The Dragon Boat Festival falls on the fifth day of the fifth month according to the Chinese lunar calender in the Warring States Period more than 2,200 years ago.

There are several different opinions on its origin. The most accepted is in memory of Qu Yuan, a famous poet and virtuous official of the Chu Kingdom (Hunan Province) at that time.

As the king refused his suggestion and when the capital of his nation was occupied by invaders, Qu wrote his final poem beside Miluo River in today's Hunan and drowned himself on the fifth day of the fifth month according to the Chinese lunar calender in 278 BC.

People were sad over the patriotic poet's death. They tossed rice and meat into the river to feed the fish, which would protect Qu's body.

To prevent the food from being eaten by dragons, they wrapped the meat in reed leaves and bamboo. That was the original glutinous rice dumpling. In later, wrapping dumplings during the Duanwu Festival became a tradition.

Ancient people believed rivers and the sea were both controlled by dragons. They were also worried Qu's spirit would be harmed by dragons. So they produced some boats with a shape similar to dragons and held races on the river to the thunderous beat of drums to warn dragons not to damage Qu's spirit. The race then became a custom.

There are many other customs attached to the Dragon Boat Festival.

Drinking rice wine on this day is believed to make people healthy and keep insects and snakes away.

People also grind traditional Chinese medicine into powder and put it in special bags called "xiang dai" or (sachet). The scent of the medicine is disliked by insects.

It's also a very welcome present during the festival. Different sachet designs can express various feelings such as love or friendship.

http://www.shanghaidaily.com/art/2006/05/29/280331/Festival_celebrates_memory_of_poet_Qu.htm

Anonymous said...

Your are Nice. And so is your site! Maybe you need some more pictures. Will return in the near future.
»